Ongoing > Metaphorical Antipodes, 2017 - present

Antipodes are diametrically opposite points on the earth. The term was first used in 1549 in relationship to Australia and New Zealand’s position on the globe, contrasting with Western Europe. I approach it as the place or condition farthest from “here.” A concrete example is my 2017 trip to the Ilulissat Icefjord in Disko Bay, Greenland, a location so remote from what most people know, yet the melting of the ice sheet will have a direct consequence on what happens in the United States. Its loss relates to the flooded streets in Miami, Florida, dying fish in the Yellowstone River, and the warming waters of the Great Lakes. Photographing the source brought “far” closer to “here” as I pull these distant places within reach of one another.

The globe is featured prominently and appears in the photographs as a broken form, both halves formerly taped together, seawater escaping through the cardboard, encased in ice, and with paint spilling out of the interior. Globes are my symbol for the antipode, directly referencing the word’s origins as a point of opposition but also as a stand-in for humanity and its fragility.

Glacial Blue
Archival Pigment Print
30" x 45"
2018
Disko Bay, Greenland and Westfjords, Iceland
Archival Pigment Print
24" x 51"
2017
Jakarta is Sinking
Archival Pigment Print
24" x 62"
2017
Building New Horizon Lines (and watching them fall)
Archival Pigment Print
40" x 40"
2019